Ahmed Dassu Letter to President Joyce Banda

On Jun 7, 2013, at 2:42 PM, Ahmed Dassu wrote:

 Excellency

 I refer to your response to my request for an audience during your visit to London for the G8 summit, which was “not available. JB,” which appears both intentionally abrupt and unbefitting of your high office and public servant number one!  Therefore I feel it prudent to address in this email the issues I had wished to discuss with you had you granted me the audience, in order to avoid any misrepresentation or misunderstanding.

 That I share a passionate interest in Malawi and its future with my colleagues Edgar and Thom of Nyasa Times, as I do with many other Malawians is widely known.  Arising from this I had expressed to Edgar and Thom some concerns regarding recent political developments and the continued unabated and open corruption in the sector of public procurement, and asked if Nyasa Times would carry an opinion piece by me, expressing these concerns.  Instead both Edgar and Thom suggested that as you were travelling to London soon I should meet you, Excellency, to put across my concerns directly.  This is what prompted me to request an audience with you.

 Turning first to the political scene.  On President Mutharika death, although I had previously expressed deep reservations about your leadership in a TV interview on MTV, I was amongst the first to publicly demand that constitutional order should prevail, and that as Vice-President you should be sworn in as President.  I convinced others to do the same, including a person who had during President Mutharika’s administration been at the forefront of publicly humiliating you and who had publicly demanded press censorship – now a leading office-bearer in your party, the PP. 

 Indeed on your swearing-in as President, in common with a majority of Malawians, I considered this as a Godsend for a new beginning for Malawi; this conviction was further strengthened by the words of wisdom in your inaugural address to the nation – full of promise and hope.

 Sadly, in office instead of being the stateswoman we had all expected you to be, you practise the politics of marginalisation and victimisation based on whether one is perceived to be your supporter or not. Instead of honouring the high expectations we Malawians built up on your assuming office, your Presidency is built and sustained on the foundations of Members of Parliament, now transformed into political prostitutes who who have been induced to defect from their own parties to your party by patronage and corruption , which the high office of President enables you to practise. Given the opportunity I would have pleaded with you, Excellency that it was not too late for you to live up to the high expectations and hope for a new beginning that were aroused on your ascendancy to the highest office in the country.  That you should focus on how Malawians judge you and how they will perceive you in posterity, and be the stateswoman that the world assumes you are instead of the power hungry, corrupt, vindictive woman, engaged in theft of public funds and who will do whatever it takes to remain in power, which is what a majority of Malawians now see you as doing.  What we see is you practising the politics of marginalisation and victimisation, all glitter in orange with no substance where it concerns democracy, accountability and transparency. 

 You are not minded to accept that you were not elected to the high office of President, just as your party was not elected to govern.  It is blatantly obvious that you are subjecting Section 65 to the patronage and corruption to sustain you an unelected President, in office instead of leading Malawi by consensus.  You have followed in the footsteps of President Mutharika and set aside Section 65 by encouraging resort to courts in the usurping of the powers of Parliament. You have condoned and sheltered those ‘political prostitutes’ who have defected to your party. In a parliamentary democracy there can be no more damning indictment.  Sadly the Speaker himself has fallen victim to allowing the usurping of the powers enshrined in the Constitution for Parliament and become a political prostitute himself.

Turning now to the issue of business, I believe that Edgar and Thom had conveyed to you the need for the wiping out of corruption in government procurement so that companies like mine and others which were prejudiced during President Mutharika’a administration could be encouraged to submit competitive tenders for fertilizer and in other areas of government procurement and thereby reduce costs and improve delivery.  

 It may be foolhardy to ask you to recall, so in the light of what has since transpired, so permit me to remind you that as Vice-President you had publicly said that President Mutharika had institutionalised corruption in government procurement of fertilizer and that you would be exposing the corruption. So it was reasonable, your having implied President Mutharika was corruptly awarding government contracts to selective companies, that these companies were guilty accomplices in the corruption of which you accused President Mutharika.  However in office you have proved no less corrupt, in fact even more so, as immediately on assuming office you proceeded to award contracts for the supply of fertilizer to the very same Indian-owned companies, except for a black indigenous Malawian who, because of his tribe and colour, was identified as a supporter of President Mutharika, when in fact he was no more a supporter of Mutharika then were Abdul Master, Apollo or the other Indians who are paying you millions of Dollars in corrupt deals.

 Indeed the vast unexplained assets and resources now at your and your party’s disposal since you assumed office are ample evidence of the high level of corruption in your government.  I go so far as to challenge the very concept of the Supplementary Fertilizer Subsidy Programme as being a manifestation of the unprecedented corrupt practices and an instrument for the bribing of voters with corruptly acquired funds by you. For as if you were cheating children in a kindergarten you cloud your corrupt misdeeds by telling Malawians that “I personally and my friends will fund the fertilizer for the Supplementary Fertilizer Subsidy Programme”. Where will the funds come from? No doubt the public purse that you are busy looting.

 And who are these friends other than those who are awarded the government contracts by you corruptly?

 In conclusion let me add that I know that in writing to you I expose myself to your reknown vindictive nature and possible victimization by you.  But I shall persevere whatever consequences I am made to suffer, for the struggle for a better, democratic, free Malawi, free from the hunger for power of individual politicians like you have turned out to be, is one I have engaged in since 1972.  My commitment to Mother Malawi is for Malawians to judge.  Indeed, I am convinced posterity will judge me a far better citizen of Malawi  than contemporary politicians like you have done.

God Bless Malawi

 Ahmed Dassu

Source: The Oracle

100 Voices: No 3

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My next guest is an Accountant and someone who I have known for many years.

Mr Lusayo Mwalilino, thank you very much for taking the time to do the 100 Voices interview.  But before we begin, could you please take some time to summarise your background?

My name is Lusayo Mwalilino, I am an accountant, currently working as an auditor, in Lilongwe. I come from Karonga, bachelor, challenge addict, some say I’m extremely cool, but that’s their opinion… 🙂

  1. As a Malawian, how important is Malawi’s Socio-Economic stability to you and your family? – Malawi’s Socio-Economic stability is very important to me because it gives me hope for the future and makes it easy for strategic planning, but most importantly I think it makes it possible for one to realise their full potential in such an environment.
  2. After nearly 50 years since independence, what visible progress do you think Malawi has made since independence, and in your view, what pressing challenges remain? In view of those challenges, what do you think is the role of government and the people in tackling those challenges? – After nearly 50 years , there has been  some  general improvements in the country’s  infrastructure such as roads, hospitals, schools, introduction of democracy, improvements in  ICT, although it should be mentioned that the infrastructure mentioned above is mostly in poor condition and there is still so much that needs to be done in terms of progress as a country.
  3. What modern and progressive ideas in other foreign countries have had the greatest impact on you, and why? – I have not lived outside Malawi however I have read  and heard  of modern & progressive ideas in other countries. Most countries moved from developing to developed economies by moving from  agricultural based to industrialised economies – making goods that they were able to trade on the world market, also up there is putting ones country first, collective patriotism.
  4. What lessons do you think Malawians and the Malawian leadership can learn from those ideas? – Malawians need to revolutionise their agricultural methods for example sophisticated irrigation methods and extensive R & D in agriculture, manufacturing of fertilizer etc. In addition to this revolutionise tourism, this could then fund a much-needed thriving industrialised economy.
  5. In your opinion, what is the greatest sign of improvement or development that has occured in Malawi in recent years? – I live here in Malawi so I would say the way the HIV/AIDS has been managed is quite remarkable, also improvements in ICT, it seems more people are using the internet, it also seems more people have access to clean water, not sure what the stats are though.
  6. What has struck you the most as the biggest sign of stagnation or regression? – The biggest sign of stagnation is just generally the state of the economy and of course the greedy and corrupt leadership.
  7.  Malawians will be going to the polls in 2014, to elect a new president. In your view what kind of leader does Malawi NEED, considering the country’s current challenges? And specifically, how should that leader approach the top job in terms of creating sustainable development and foreign reducing aid dependency? – Sometimes it feels like African countries are going through perpetual cycle of ‘elect and regret’; however one must remain hopeful, I believe Malawi needs an exceptionally intelligent, selfless, driven leader who is truly passionate about making changes to the country.
  8.  As you know, Tobacco is Malawi’s biggest source of export revenue. Looking at the problems that have plagued the tobacco industry in recent times, what alternatives do you think Malawi has besides Tobacco, and why are they viable alternatives? – Other viable alternatives are; cotton, coffee, supplying fresh bottled water to Middle Eastern countries, rice, fish exports. Some of these are already being done but could be done in a more sophisticated way, and on a larger scale.
  9.  Considering our troubled history with donors and funders such as the IMF and World Bank, most recently when Bingu Wa Mutharika was president, how do you see Malawi progressing from this relationship in view of the criticisms these organisations have received in the media across the world? – Malawi cannot win by depending on these institutions, which do not understand our economy, and may advise us with ulterior motives. Our leaders should strive to think of what is best for their country and not just adopt a herd mentality, fiscal discipline is key.
  10.  We now know that Malawi has some precious minerals, including Uranium, possibly oil and other natural resources. How do you think the present government is doing regarding managing Malawi’s natural resources? – I would give the present government a  4 out of 10, not very impressive. Botswana on the other hand has done well in managing their minerals [see sources 1, 2], we could learn from a lot from them.
  11.  In your view, can the government do better to manage natural resources? If so, how can it do better? – Yes they can, basically by making sure the interest of the country , not an individual or any mining organisation  are put first, come up with mining contracts that ensure this is achieved, as well as thorough reviews of these agreements. Learn from other countries that are doing it successfully.
  12. What is your answer to increasing transparency and eradicating corruption which is plaguing most governments across Africa? – By putting in systems and controls that prevent corruption from occurring, as well as a system that annually reviews progress being made on corruption and transparency , from the highest office in the land to the lowest paid civil servants  by an  independent group of audit firms. This could mean amendments to the constitution.It seems possible in theory but may realistically, be extremely hard to implement, because as long as there is abject poverty, corruption will exist, which gradually becomes a culture, even at organisational level changing an organisations culture is a difficult task, it could minimise it though.
  13. Any famous last words? We cannot let the easy seductive funk of despair, negativity and doubt undermine the critical forces for change; hope, faith and action  –  Cory Booker

100 Voices is a collection of reflections, views, opinions, ideas and thoughts by Malawians across the world, regarding the past, present and future of Malawi.